Back to tutorials

It’s been kind of depressing quitting the tutorials, trying to paint watercolour paintings all by myself.

It’s also shown in the paintings themselves.

This is the watercolour paintings I’ve painted using tutorials:

And these are the paintings I’ve painted all by myself:

In my opinion there’s no doubt that the paintings by tutorials are much better.

It’s not very surprising, I know. But it shows that I may need some more practice using tutorials before I decide to go solo again.

They do really help a lot with taking the right decisions during the process 🙂

So, I went back to youtube and did another painting by Tim Wilmot.

I started with a quick outline sketch:

The outline sketch

Then the wash:

The wash

And then came the final layer:

A shadowed alley

It took about an hour finishing it, and I’m very happy with how it turned out.

I was a bit concerned about the wash being to dark, but it turned out fine. The smudges of paint did also get concealed in the second layer.

So, to sum up, I think I’ll stick to the tutorials for just a few paintings more 🙂

8 thoughts on “Back to tutorials

  1. Whatever works best, right? I think it’s great that you keep evaluating your art and get the help you need in order to move forward. I do like the color compositions in your personal works.

    1. Yes, indeed ☺ I think doing some tutorials are the right choice for me right now. I need to get the basics set in my mind ☺ I’m glad you like the colours I’ve chosen, though. I tend to just go with what I feel like ☺

  2. Hi, Kim, you are doing well, both in the tutorial pictures and your own. I think one of the things that’s making you dissatisfied with your own attempts is a cohesive shadow shape. Our brains often skip over seeing shadows because they aren’t a thing; they’re an abstract less-light place. You could even take one of these “finished” paintings that you don’t like and see what happens when you put in a good shadow. Don’t use gray! Use a darker value of the color already under the shadow. (E.g. shadows on grass are a darker green, a shadow on a red car is a darker red. The exception is a shadow on a white building, which is a dull purply-blue.)

    1. Thanks, Ruth 🙂 That’s a good tip. I’ve tried to have a conscious mind about shadows, but I’ve struggled with making them match the shapes of their outcome. Especially when it’s reflected in water. There may also be shadows I don’t register, thinking that there’s none to see in a certain area.

      I’ve done my best to drop the grey/black shadows, but just using a darker value of the colour underneath seems like a good rule 🙂

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